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The Waynesboro Economic Development Authority is a seven member board appointed by City Council and charged with promoting the economic wellbeing of the community. In addition to its legal authority to issue industrial development bonds, the EDA directs strategic planning initiatives, oversees economic development incentives, and leads outreach efforts to the business community.  Staff support is provided by the Office of Economic Development.

Waynesboro, Virginia

Waynesboro is a vibrant and historic City in the heart of Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley.

Our manufacturing heritage dates to the 1800’s when companies  flocked to the area to take advantage of the water and transportation access.  Stoves, doors, furniture, bricks, barrels, dairy products, paper, and matches all carried the “Made in Waynesboro” label.

Later, DuPont, Crompton, Mohawk, and GE established a major presence in the city for the same reasons.

The City marketing message at the time was “the four W’s”

  • Water for the vast natural resources in the area
  • Workers for the dedicated and productive workforce
  • Weather for the temperate climate
  • Wheels for the rail access- the north-south line (now Norfolk and Southern) crosses the east-west line (now CSX) in the city.

Today’s message is much the same.  The city and surrounding area has vast natural resources, productive workforce, temperate weather, and the two railways are now joined by two interstate highways and five airports.

City of Waynesboro

The City of Waynesboro is centrally located along the I-81 corridor in the eastern portion of Virginia’s scenic and historic Shenandoah Valley.  Our convenient location along I-64 provides easy access to major locations in the Midwest and eastern seaboard.

Exit numbers to the city from I-64 are: exit 99 to 250 west, exit 96 to Delphine Ave, and exit 94 to Rosser Ave. and from I-81, exit 222 to 250 east.

Waynesboro is an independent city covering approximately 15 square miles and is located in the eastern portion of Augusta County.  Staunton is located eight miles to the west and Charlottesville is 29 miles to the east.

The Blue Ridge Parkway, Skyline Drive, and the Appalachian Trail intersect four miles to the Southeast of the city.

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City of Waynes page map_Downtown-Detail-ED-and-City-H

Office of Economic Development

Economic Development Hero

Whether you are looking to start, locate or expand your business, host your state or regional conference, or simply plan your summer vacation we can help. The professional staff at the Waynesboro, Virginia Office of Economic Development and Tourism is available to provide information, contacts, and assistance. We work with realtors, developers, large industries, and local businesses to make your project a success through up-to-date demographic data, location assistance, and access to state and local financing options.

Meet The Staff

Economic Development Authority

Economic Development Authority Hero

The Waynesboro Economic Development Authority is a seven member board appointed by City Council and charged with promoting the economic wellbeing of the community. In addition to its legal authority to issue industrial development bonds, the EDA directs strategic planning initiatives, oversees economic development incentives, and leads outreach efforts to the business community.  Staff support is provided by the Office of Economic Development.

In 2011, the EDA received a USDA Rural Development grant to establish a revolving loan fund for small business.

On December 9, 2011, the EDA formally adopted the Five Year Economic Development Strategic Plan. The complete plan or a four page overview is available for download.

Currently serving on the Waynesboro Economic Development Authority are the following local business leaders:

  • Perry Fridley, Chairman
  • Mary Sullivan, Vice Chairman
  • Tom Reider
  • Jim Hyson
  • Kris Krupa
  • George Reed
  • Tami Radecke
  • Gregory E. Hitchin, Secretary & Treasurer

The EDA meets regularly on the second Friday of each month at 8:00 am in the Economic Development Conference Room at 301 West Main Street unless otherwise noted.  Meeting dates are listed below, click the date for meeting agendas and minutes.

January 11, 2019 – CANCELED
February 8, 2019
March 8, 2019
April 12, 2019
May 10, 2019
June 14, 2019

 

Downloads

EDA Bond Rules and Procedures

EDA Strategic Plan

EDA Strategic Plan Summary

Downtown Business District

main-street-with-american-flags hero

Recognized by the National Main Street America program as part of the Affiliate Program, The City of Waynesboro is pursuing renewed life for its downtown, with a path directed at building momentum for entrepreneurial opportunity, attracting new downtown residents, and developing a draw for tourists.  Local Facade and Sidewalk/Landscaping grants are available to assist owners. Learn more about our downtown revitalization projects.

History

History

When the pass through the Blue Ridge Mountains was discovered making westward expansion possible, Joseph Tees purchased a 900-acre parcel of land in 1743. When he died, his two sons divided the property between them.  William received the portion that was on both sides of the South River and the road going from Charlottesville to Staunton.  Upon the death of William, the property went to his wife and only child, Jane.  Unofficially the area was known as Teesville.  Jane married Samuel Estill and the couple bought the property rights from her mother in 1790.  Estill, in 1798, platted an area of 83 building lots with streets and alleys on both sides of the road and just west of the river.  In September 1800, 41 landowners petitioned the General Assembly to recognize the hamlet as Waynesborough, a name Estill selected in honor of General Anthony Wayne.  This was granted in January 1801 and the town was incorporated in 1834.

The town was raided by the Union Army in 1864 and, on March 2, 1865, the Battle of Waynesboro occurred.  The battle, which resulted in the defeat of General Jubal Early’s Confederate forces, was the last fought in the Shenandoah Valley.

Waynesboro was reincorporated in 1874.  In 1881, when the north-south railroad crossed the east-west line a new boomtown, Basic City, was established at that junction.

For thirty-two years Basic City and Waynesboro existed side-by-side, but ultimately consolidated under the name Waynesboro-Basic in 1923.  The following year the town was officially renamed Waynesboro and experienced a surge in industrial development that sustained economic stability through World War II.  In 1948 the town attained first-class independent city status.  Annexations at the time and in 1986 gave the City the room for expansion that is now present-day Waynesboro.

Population growth to the town was slow at first. In 1810, the town had a population of 250. By 1860, that number grew to 457. The town maintained a steady stream of visitors, however, due to its position on the Valley Turnpike, which took advantage of connections through Rockfish Gap.  The town flourished in the years that followed and gained greater access to major trading markets when the east-west railroad reached it in 1854 and the Crozet tunnel was completed through the Blue Ridge Mountains in 1858.

Some of the remaining buildings from this period of its history include the Plumb House (now a museum open for tours seasonally) and the Coiner-Quesenbury House built in 1806, believed to be the first brick house built in the town, which is still standing on Main Street.

Downloads

Tourism Development Zone

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Virginia Top Business State

Forbes ranked Virginia #1 in regulatory environment, #2 in labor supply and #5 in quality of life, keeping Virginia in the 2014 top four Best States for Business and Careers (Forbes.com, November 2014)

What makes Virginia a Top State for Business?

Business-first values

  • Virginia’s leaders are committed to businesses’ needs, free enterprise, and maintaining a profit-friendly environment
  • An experienced and professional economic development team- focused on concierge service and solutions for business
  • Right-to-work state- third lowest unionization rate in the country

Easy access to domestic and global markets

  • Washington Dulles International Airport
  • The Port of Virginia
  • Two of the nation’s largest railroads operate in Virginia

Stable and low operating costs

  • 6% corporate income tax rate has not been increased since 1972
  • One of the lowest average workers’ compensation costs and unemployment burdens in the U.S.

Talented and educated work force

  • TechAmerica, the leading high-tech trade association, ranks Virginia as the national leader for its concentration of high-tech workers
  • Nearly 20,000 doctoral scientists and engineers are employed in Virginia- one of the highest concentrations in the nation
  • More than 500,000 students are enrolled in over 100 in-state institutions of higher education

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